CatNappers

What is CatNappers?

CatNappers is a low-cost trap, neuter, and return effort for community cats in southwest Georgia. Our objective is to put an end to multiple unwanted litters in addition to preventing cats from living on the street, in alleys, or other hidden places, all without the possibility of finding a nurturing home. We provide help to these community cats, which includes stray, abandoned, semi-feral and feral cats. It may help to know that many cats erroneously termed feral are not; they are often abandoned domestic cats that have become fearful due to lack of human contact.

Why are they called community cats?

Community cats exist through thoughtless actions of people in a given community. People fail to spay or neuter a cat, allow it to roam freely, and are amazingly surprised when it mates and brings home babies. Instead of taking yet another opportunity to "fix" the problem, they resort to dumping unwanted cats upon someone else or throw them out in a place they assume the cats can survive. They've done their "good deed" . . . dumped them into a place where they think cats can survive . . . and they go home with no more thoughts about the cats that don't know how to take care of themselves. It's undeniably because of community that these cats live on the streets. It's because of the community that these cats will breed out of control. It's because of the community that they will die cruelly and suffer hardships, except for the kindness of people who spay or neuter them and care for them by tending to their needs for food and shelter. It's a community-caused problem that needs a community effort to fix these community cats. The standard method of trap and kill has failed miserably. Trap, Neuter, and Return (TNR) is a better alternative – it means that cats will be fixed, given a rabies shot and cared for. It's proven that you simply cannot kill your way out of cat overpopulation, and leaving them to breed is certainly not an option. Preventing litters in the first place by spay or neuter prevents overpopulation and the fixed adult cats will receive care for the remainder of their lives. The population will shrink with time and it's a great first step to solving the problem humanely.